Cardiometabolic Chronicle

The Spectrum of Cardiovascular Prevention: Obesity Paradox, Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviors and Emerging Therapeutics in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

A conversation with Salvatore Carbone, PhD, Assistant Professor at the Department of Kinesiology & Health Sciences, College of Humanities & Sciences at the Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, VA.

CARDIOMETABOLIC CHRONICLE: An interesting concept that has been proposed is the “obesity paradox,” a view that obesity confers some sort of protection for adverse CV events. Can you comment on what is the basis for this and whether it is a real phenomenon?

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  2. 2. Carbone, Salvatore, et al. “Obesity paradox in cardiovascular disease: where do we stand?.” Vascular Health and Risk Management 15 (2019): 89 - 100.
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